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Vegetables
Fresh Fish Chowder

A healthy dinner that's low in fat, high in protein and can feed 6 to 8 people. The fish should be fresh and can be a mix of haddock, salmon, monkfish, cod - just avoid denser, steak-like fish such as tuna or swordfish. I like the combination of rockfish (aka striped bass) and salmon.

You can cook the fish 2 ways. Either:
-in the soup; or
-under the broiler, then add it to the soup.

I prefer the broiler. I think it adds additional flavor and it also gives me something to do while the potatoes are cooking.

The corn in this recipe's unsung hero. Fresh corn, cut right from the cob, is nature's vegan butter. If it's just not that time of year, you can use frozen, combined with one can of Creamed Corn. The natural nectar that's part of good creamed corn gets you closer to the real, fresh thing.

1 T. butter
1 T. olive oil
2 large onions, chopped
4 potatoes, peeled & cubed
3 c. water, or broth
2 cans evaporated milk
3 lbs. fresh fish
4 ears fresh corn
1 T. parsley

Line a cookie sheet with foil and coat with cooking spray. Lay in the fish, skin side down and spray with more cooking spray, or drizzle with olive oil. Season the fish with Old Bay or cajun spices, or your own mix of salt and whatnot. Set this aside and turn on your oven's broiler to preheat it.

Heat oil & butter in heavy soup pot over medium heat. Saute chopped onions for 10 minutes, until soft and translucent, while you peel and cube the potatoes.

Stir in cubed potatoes and the water. Bring to boil. Cover and cook over low heat for 10 minutes until the potatoes are tender.

During this time, pop the fish under the broiler and cut the corn from the cobs. Stir the corn and the milk into the soup. {yes, the liquid in the soup is just potato-water and milk, if you thought you were missing something}

When the fish can easily flake with a fork, remove it from broiler. If properly cooked, the skin should easily come off, so now's the time to remove and discard it, if you please. Lightly separate the fish up into large chunks and carefully stir these into the pot.

Cover and allow to simmer for 10 minutes, carefully not to let it boil (a small simmering boil is okay). Stir in parseley and salt & pepper to taste.

This can easily be made within 30 minutes.

Comments: Send us comments about this recipe steve@pulpkitchen.com